Works Cited: "What's So Funny? Ask a Psychologist"

In This Section:

Publications and Resources

by Elizabeth W. Davies

Bader, M. (1993). The analyst’s use of humor. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 62, 23-51.

Baker, R. (1999). The delicate balance between the use and abuse of humor in the psychoanalytic setting. In J. W. Barron (Ed.) (1999). Humor and psyche: Psychoanalytic perspectives. Hillsdale, N.J.: The Analytic Press.

Barron, J. W. (Ed.) (1999). Humor and psyche: Psychoanalytic perspectives. Hillsdale, N.J.: The Analytic Press.

Cousins, N. (1979). Anatomy of an illness as perceived by the patient. New York: W. W. Norton.

Cohen, T. (1999). Jokes: Philosophical thoughts on joking matters. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. As cited in Phillips, Adam (2000). You call that a breakfast? London Review of Books, Feb. 17, 2000.

Ekman P., Davidson R. J., & Friesen W. V. (1990). The Duchenne smile: Emotional expression and brain physiology II. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 58, 342-353.

Freud, S. (1960). Jokes and their relation to the unconscious (J. Strachey, Trans. and Ed.). New York: W. W. Norton. (Original work published 1905.)

Garcia, R. (Writer and director and one of the executive producers ). (28 January 2008). Laura: Week one In Treatment. New York, N.Y.: HBO.

Giovacchini, P. (1996, November). Changing clinical orientation, humor and the transitional space. Hans W. Loewald Memorial Address, presented at the Seventh Annual Interdisciplinary Conference of the International Federation for Psychoanalytic Education, Boca Raton, Fla.

Gladwell, M. (2002). The naked face. The New Yorker, Aug. 5, 2002.

Grigoriadis, V. (January 2013). Survival of the funniest. Vanity Fair. Retrieved from http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2013/01/tig-notaro-breast-cancer-dont-connect-with-jokes

Grotstein, J. S. (1999). Humor and its relation to the unconscious. In J. W. Barron (Ed.), Humor and psyche: Psychoanalytic perspectives. Hillsdale, N.J.: The Analytic Press.

Kohut, H. (1978). Forms and transformations of narcissism. In P. Ornstein (Ed.), The search for the self: Selected writings of Heinz Kohut: 1950-1978, vol. 1 (pp.427-460). New York, N.Y.: International Universities Press. (Original work published in 1966.)

Lachmann, F. M. (2000). Humour and spontaneity in the therapeutic process. Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis, 11(2), 287-312.

Martin, R. A. (2007). The psychology of humor: An integrative approach. Burlington, Mass.: Elsevier Academic Press.

Martin, R. A. (2001). Humor, laughter, and physical health: Methodological issues and research findings. Psychological Bulletin, 127(4), 504-519.

Marx, P. Participant in “Ink on Shrinks: Writers in on Therapy.” Stony Brook Manhattan Writers Speak series, Dec. 5, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhWj4gfyfGI
Minute 20.

Menaker, D. “Ink on Shrinks: Writers in on Therapy, Stony Brook Manhattan Writers Speak series, Sept. 26, 2011. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5f4m4vuUi4. Minute 62.

Mitchell, S. and Black, M. (1995). Freud and beyond: A history of modern psychoanalytic thought. New York, N.Y.: Basic Books.

Phillips, Adam (2000). You call that a breakfast? London Review of Books, Feb. 17, 2000.

Silver, A. (2012). Reminiscence: My analysis with Harold Searles. Division Review: A Quarterly Psychoanalytic Forum, 4, 33-38.

Winnicott, D. W. (1964). Further thoughts on babies as persons. In The child, the family, and the outside world (pp. 85-92). Harmondsworth, England: Penguin Books. (Original work published in 1947.) The source in the article for the thought, “There is no such thing as a baby.”

Winnicott, D. W. (1971). Playing and reality. New York, N.Y.: Routledge. 

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