Photo Gallery and Footnotes: "Home Economics: Ever Timely and Forever Complex"

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Publications and Resources

by Yvonne S. Gentzler

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1 Conference minutes for each of the 10 meetings can be found here.

2 See, for instance, thisthis; this; and this.

3 For a complete history of home economics, see Vincenti, V. B. and Browne, L. (2009). The Heritage of the Profession. The Heritage of Home Economics (Segment 3). Lansing, Mich.:  Kappa Omicron Nu Honor Society; or Marjorie Brown’s 1985 two-volume work, Philosophical Studies in Home Economics in the United States: Our Practical-Intellectual Heritage. East Lansing, Mich.: Michigan State University.
 
4-7 Accurate minutes of the original meetings can be found here. Scholarly interpretations of those minutes can be found in Brown’s Philosophical Studies in Home Economics in the United States: Our Practical-Intellectual Heritage, or in Stage, S. and Vincenti, V. B. (Eds.). (1997). Rethinking Home Economics: Women and the History of a Profession. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press or via Google Books.

8 All statistics in this paragraph come from “American Labor in the 20th Century,” by Donald M. Fisk, Bureau of Labor Statistics, posted Jan. 20, 2003.

9 The definition of home economics was first presented in this document, followed by critiques from two renowned philosophers outside the profession and a number of leaders in the profession. Brown, M., and Paolucci, B. (1978). Home Economics: A Definition. American Home Economics Association.

10 A conference focusing on unity and identity, including representatives from five different associations, was held in Scottsdale, Ariz. The name selected for the profession was Family and Consumer Sciences, believed to position it for the 21st century. Specifics can be found in The Heritage of the Profession. The Heritage of Home Economics (Segment 3).

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi