Footnotes: "Learning STEMs beyond the Classroom"

In This Section:

Publications and Resources

by Catherine C. Shoults and Lenore Shoults

1Statement of STEM Education Coalition Core Policy Principles 2011.”

2 A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement, a 2002 report by Anne T. Henderson and Karen L. Mapp for the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.

3 See, for example, Sophia Catsambis, “Expanding Knowledge of Parental Involvement in Children’s Secondary Education: Connections with High School Seniors’ Academic Success,” Social Psychology of Education, 5: 2001, 149-177.

4 A New Wave of Evidence.

5 See, for example, A New Wave of Evidence and “Position Statement: Parent Involvement in Science Learning,” April 2009, National Science Teachers Association. http://www.nsta.org/about/positions/parents.aspx.

6 “Position Statement: Parent Involvement in Science Learning.”

7 See, for example, Jacqueline Barber, Nicole Parizeau, and Lincoln Bergman, Spark Your Child's Success in Math and Science: Practical Advice for Parents, Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, 2002.

8 “Position Statement: Parent Involvement in Science Learning.”

9 Go online to http://www.accreditedonlinecolleges.com/blog/2010/kitchen-chemistry-100-cool-food-science-experiments-for-kids-and-cooks/. For other STEM fun for little kids, go online to http://www2.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/science/index.html.

10 “Statement of STEM Education Coalition Core Policy Principles 2011.” 

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi